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Notes on Booking to Travel in 2021 and Beyond

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There has been a lot in the news about travel starting up again from the US and Canada, and countries re-opening for international tourism. Some of our favourite destinations welcoming guests are Iceland and the Faroe Islands.

However, it is important to note that, even though a country has decided to accept international tourists again, the availability of accommodations and tours will be limited. This may be the case for quite some time.

For instance, hotels may have been using down time to do renovations, which may or may not be finished. As well, it takes time to gear up for business any year, but especially this one, after having been closed for so many months. Reservation systems need to be reactivated, staff needs to be re-hired, and supplies need to be restocked before being able to accept new guests. This severely limits the properties and number of rooms we can book for our clients. Rental cars are in especially short supply, as rental companies were not able to maintain a full fleet of vehicles during the long months there was no demand.

We’ve also found that when we’re re-booking cancelled 2021 Arctic expedition cruises onto sailings in 2022 and 2023, some cabin categories are already unavailable and some cruises are completely sold out. The same situation is happening for Churchill polar bear tours and other small-group programs around the world. Less supply (at least temporarily), more demand (because people are chomping at the bit to travel again)! Even within Canada, the restrictions between provinces have caused uncertainty among tour operators. Not all tourism experiences may be operational, or may offer reduced capacity.

So, what have recent bookings taught us? The most important lesson is that, as travel starts up again, there will be limited inventory for a time and high pent-up demand for the programs that are operating. We highly recommend that, if you hope to travel later in 2021, in 2022 and even 2023, that you book soon.

Suggesting you book now for travel a year and even two years from now may seem unrealistic. But in doing so you can avoid the disappointment of not getting space on the trip you really want; take advantage of the awesome early booking offers that are currently in place; and relax knowing you have definite reservations for your future adventures. We all need something to look forward to these days! With flexible and generous cancellation and rebooking policies in place with most airlines, hotels, tour companies and rental car companies, getting space booked now on the trip of your choice is the best plan. Your reservations can be changed as needed later on, depending on travel restrictions, with minimal hassle and little to no financial risk. In fact, many companies are offering bonuses on future travel credits or are holding current prices for future, rebooked trips. So, there really is no downside to getting booked now. Whether you're interested in a faraway African Uganda Gorilla Trek or exploring the east coast of Canada with an Atlantic Maritimes Tour, Contact us to begin exploring the possibilities!

Out on the Tundra in Churchill

Aug 12, 2021 / Indigeno Team

WRITTEN BY LOIS FARLEY “Sssshhhh, turn around quietly and look out the window.” Those were the words said in hushed tones by our tour host as we were happily sitting in the lounge car of the Tundra Buggy Lodge™, having a wee drink before …

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Notes on Booking to Travel in 2021 and Beyond

Aug 12, 2021 / Indigeno Team

There has been a lot in the news about travel starting up again from the US and Canada, and countries re-opening for international tourism. Some of our favourite destinations welcoming guests are Iceland and the Faroe Islands. However, it is important to note that, even though …

Read More

Our Top Five Places to Watch the Northern Lights

Aug 12, 2021 / Indigeno Team

Have you ever wondered how those bright dancing lights are created? They are actually collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth’s atmosphere. In the northern hemisphere, they are called Aurora borealis; in the southern half, Aurora australis. The colours …

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